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Route 132 près du pont-tunnel: la SQ loue un avion pour surveiller les automobilistes

Route 132 près du pont-tunnel: la SQ loue un avion pour surveiller les automobilistes
Aimée Lemieux
le 13 juin à 15:41

Sur la route 132, à l’entrée du pont-tunnel Louis-Hippolyte-La Fontaine, à Longueuil, la Sûreté du Québec (SQ) surveillera assidûment les automobilistes, alors que le corps policier a reçu de nombreuses plaintes de citoyens dénonçant des conducteurs qui doublent tout le monde aux heures de pointe, rapporte Radio-Canada.

La Sûreté du Québec a loué un avion, cette semaine, pour traquer les automobilistes fautifs.

 

L’avion de type Cessna, loué à l’aéroport de Saint-Hubert, a quitté l'aéroport vers 6 h 40, mardi matin, pour se rendre à temps à l’heure de pointe au-dessus de la 132.

 

Des dizaines de contraventions ont été données, aujourd’hui, à ceux qui ont coupé au dernier moment en traversant la ligne blanche continue, indique le média.

 

«[La pratique] cause aussi souvent, malheureusement, de nombreuses collisions, matérielles, mais également avec blessés. […] Les gens qui s’immobilisent pour couper vont s’immobiliser dans une voie qui a une vitesse réglementaire de 100 km/h », a dit la sergente Ingrid Asselin, en entrevue avec Radio-Canada.

 

Franchir une ligne blanche peut coûter 3 points d’inaptitude et 311 $ d’amende.


Commentaires

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le 13 juin à 20:30, par DonnaJoG,

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